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National Pollinator Week: • was founded and is led by the Pollinator Partnership dedicated exclusively to the…

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Wednesday, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Houston Chapter of NPAT Texas Prairie Restoration: One Goal, Multiple Approaches. How past land use dictates restoration efforts. • Andy…

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Pedaling the Prairie - Chisholm Trail Park Wednesday, from 6 – 7pm Chisholm Trail Community Center, 4936 McPherson Blvd, Fort…

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Prairie Facts

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February 28 - March 2, 2018 - Austin, TX

Wednesday, May 03, 2017

Milkweed Planted on Kirchoff Family Farm, Wilson County

Thursday, Apr 06, 2017

Don Kirchoff wrote:

“Yesterday, 04/05/17, ecologist, Chris Best and I transplanted 20 zizotes seedlings to our milkweed garden on the Kirchoff Prairie.

(We have 45 more ready to transplant and approximately 30 small ones that should be ready for transplant this fall.)

More significantly, the two USFWS interns conducted their monarch habitat survey yesterday located an Antelope Horn milkweed plant with four seed capsules on the N side of the property. 

Chris said that because the plant had seed capsules it is certain that another plant exists within a bumble bee’s foraging distance of this first plant discovered.

No antelope horns we have transplanted to the prairie and grown from seeds we collected in the Edwards Plateau or DeWitt County have survived in our black clay soil. Therefore, the plant discovered yesterday by the interns must be native and must have unique genetics for it to thrive in this Wilson County black land environment.

We will wrap the plant in bridal cloth to assure that the seeds to not escape us when the capsules open.”
Don

References:
Zizotes milkweed (Asclepias oenotheroides)
USFWS
Antelope Horn milkweed (Asclepias asperula) 

November 10-12, 2017 - TXSER 2017 Annual Conference - Denton, TX

Thursday, Mar 23, 2017

Plan on joining fellow Texas Society for Ecological Restoration members and friends on the campus of the University of North Texas in Denton for the 2017 Annual Conference. 
Conference planning is underway; we will provide updates as plans evolve, monitor our website: TXSER. 

A Rare Tuft

Wednesday, Feb 22, 2017

via The National Parks Conservation Association:

A Rare Tuft: Can grass nerds save an extremely rare grass that lives high in the mountains of Big Bend National Park?

by Kate Siber

“The Guadalupe fescue is an unlikely celebrity in the plant world. A slim, knee-high bunchgrass with delicate pale yellow blooms, it looks like other grasses that grow in the high peaks of the Chihuahuan Desert. But though its appearance is unremarkable, the Guadalupe fescue is different. It is among the rarest plants in the world and a prized find for botanists. In the U.S., it sprouts in only one location: a cool forested enclave along the popular Boot Canyon Trail high in the Chisos Mountains of Texas’ Big Bend National Park.”

CLICK HERE TO READ THE FULL ARTICLE

Creating Or Recreating a Prairie by Charles Allen

Wednesday, Feb 01, 2017

The BLOG of the Houston Chapter of NPAT has shared a most informative article, “Creating Or Recreating a Prairie”, written by Charles Allen, who is also active in the Cajun Prairie Society in Pitkin, Louisiana!  See photos and read Mr. Allen’s recommendations on how to build a prairie. 

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