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WORK MORNING at White Rock LakeSponsored by North Texas Master NaturalistsSaturday, beginning at 9:30 amMeetup at “Boy Scout Hill” at the…

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Wednesday from 8am-4pm Info on CEU hours, the day’s Agenda and RSVP via this link!

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HOW TURTLES FIT INTO THE PRAIRIE ECOSYSTEM by Eric C. Munsche, Research Ecologist HNPAT Program Meeting, Wednesday, 6:30pm The American Red Cross,

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Prairie Facts

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Save the Date - July 11-12, 2017 –  Konza Prairie, KS

Thursday, May 18, 2017

Stay tuned for more info - Registration will begin in about two weeks!

Grassland Restoration Network

“GRN” is a loose affiliation of people trying to use prairie restoration (reconstruction) as a way to rebuild, conserve and sustain grassland ecosystems.  Each year, we put on a workshop to share ideas, techniques, research results, and stories with other.  Workshops are hosted by a different site each year, giving us the opportunity to visit a range of projects over the years.  We were happy to host the workshop here in Nebraska in 2016.

Sign up early so you can join us at Konza Prairie Biological Station in Manhattan, KS.
This workshop will be limited on space, and priority will be given to people actively working on, or studying, large scale prairie restoration:
Overview and field presentations on long-term plot and watershed-level studies in grassland ecology.
This year’s workshop will focus how science at this National Science Foundation-funded Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site has deepened our understanding of drivers influencing pattern and process in tallgrass prairie.
Discussions will focus on how science can inform grassland restoration.
This will be a great opportunity to learn from the intensive and impressive array of prairie research going on at this Kansas State University research site.  They have done research specifically on prairie restoration, but also a lot of other work that relates closely to the kinds of challenges faced by those of us working to restore grasslands. 

“The Hubbard Fellows and I made a trip to Konza back in 2014, and I wrote three blog posts about the trip and still didn’t feel like I covered everything we learned and discussed.  You can read those blog posts here (Part 1), here (Part 2), and here (Part 3)”. Chris Helzer, Director of Science for The Nature Conservancy in Nebraska

February 28 - March 2, 2018 - Austin, TX

Wednesday, May 03, 2017

Milkweed Planted on Kirchoff Family Farm, Wilson County

Thursday, Apr 06, 2017

Don Kirchoff wrote:

“Yesterday, 04/05/17, ecologist, Chris Best and I transplanted 20 zizotes seedlings to our milkweed garden on the Kirchoff Prairie.

(We have 45 more ready to transplant and approximately 30 small ones that should be ready for transplant this fall.)

More significantly, the two USFWS interns conducted their monarch habitat survey yesterday located an Antelope Horn milkweed plant with four seed capsules on the N side of the property. 

Chris said that because the plant had seed capsules it is certain that another plant exists within a bumble bee’s foraging distance of this first plant discovered.

No antelope horns we have transplanted to the prairie and grown from seeds we collected in the Edwards Plateau or DeWitt County have survived in our black clay soil. Therefore, the plant discovered yesterday by the interns must be native and must have unique genetics for it to thrive in this Wilson County black land environment.

We will wrap the plant in bridal cloth to assure that the seeds to not escape us when the capsules open.”
Don

References:
Zizotes milkweed (Asclepias oenotheroides)
USFWS
Antelope Horn milkweed (Asclepias asperula) 

November 10-12, 2017 - TXSER 2017 Annual Conference - Denton, TX

Thursday, Mar 23, 2017

Plan on joining fellow Texas Society for Ecological Restoration members and friends on the campus of the University of North Texas in Denton for the 2017 Annual Conference. 
Conference planning is underway; we will provide updates as plans evolve, monitor our website: TXSER. 

A Rare Tuft

Wednesday, Feb 22, 2017

via The National Parks Conservation Association:

A Rare Tuft: Can grass nerds save an extremely rare grass that lives high in the mountains of Big Bend National Park?

by Kate Siber

“The Guadalupe fescue is an unlikely celebrity in the plant world. A slim, knee-high bunchgrass with delicate pale yellow blooms, it looks like other grasses that grow in the high peaks of the Chihuahuan Desert. But though its appearance is unremarkable, the Guadalupe fescue is different. It is among the rarest plants in the world and a prized find for botanists. In the U.S., it sprouts in only one location: a cool forested enclave along the popular Boot Canyon Trail high in the Chisos Mountains of Texas’ Big Bend National Park.”

CLICK HERE TO READ THE FULL ARTICLE

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