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National Pollinator Week: • was founded and is led by the Pollinator Partnership dedicated exclusively to the…

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Wednesday, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Houston Chapter of NPAT Texas Prairie Restoration: One Goal, Multiple Approaches. How past land use dictates restoration efforts. • Andy…

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Pedaling the Prairie - Chisholm Trail Park Wednesday, from 6 – 7pm Chisholm Trail Community Center, 4936 McPherson Blvd, Fort…

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Prairie Facts

Did you know June 19 - 25, 2017 is “National Pollinator Week”?

National Pollinator Week:
was founded and is led by the Pollinator Partnership dedicated exclusively to the protection and promotion of pollinators and their ecosystems.
is a time to celebrate pollinators and spread the word about what you can do to protect them! 
is a critical event to draw major attention to the importance Native Pollinators—bees, butterflies, moths, bats and birds—play to the world, their status, and how essential they are to people, food, the economy and ecosystems!

   

Dozens of conservation organizations across the U.S. formed the National Pollinator Garden Network “NPGN” in 2014 and launched the Million Pollinator Garden Challenge, a call to action to preserve and create gardens and landscapes that help revive the health of bees, butterflies, birds, bats and other pollinators across America. It is a response to President Barack Obama’s federal strategy to promote the health of pollinators by restoring or enhancing millions of acres of land for pollinators. 

Native pollinators can be two to three times as effective at pollinating agricultural crops as non-native honeybees.  They need native plants and natural landscapes to survive!

We’ve summarized how two well-known NPGN participants responsed to the ‘call to action’The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center and the National Wildlife Federation.

Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center created:
Support Monarchs Through Project Milkweed to increase abundance of native milkweeds, by collecting & distributing seeds of NATIVE TEXAS MILKWEEDS to local growers so they can grow and promote local milkweed availability.
Become a Milkweed Grower - Growers participating in Project Milkweed are expected to grow a new generation of milkweeds from the seeds they receive from the Wildflower Center and then use these plants as a starter population to increase seed production.
How Pollinators Help Cotton Farmers - According to a study of South Texas by The University of Texas at Austin: increasing the diversity of pollinator species, including bees, flies and butterflies, can dramatically increase cotton production.  Increasing the diversity of pollinators could boost cotton production by up to 18 percent, yielding an increase in annual revenue of more than $1.1 million.
Browse Pollinator-Friendly Plants by Region or Insect Special Collections section of the Native Plant Information Network. They post lists of native plants recommended for various purposes; researchers can browse the collection or search within it using the combination search.

NWF created:
Mayors Monarch Pledge –This map shows participating cities and their commitments across the U.S. and a tri-national agreement with Canada and Mexico, to increase habitat for the monarch butterfly and other native pollinators.  We’ve captured a portion of the map identifying the Participating Texas Cities!

Certified Habitat Program -owners/managers provide native plant habitat, food water, shelter and places to rear young for all types of wild creatures including pollinators. 
Butterfly Heroes Program provides seed packets and garden starter kits to youth groups, families and children to create monarch and pollinator gardens in communities across the U.S. 
Native Plant Finder helps gardeners and habitat managers identify plants and trees for their locale that have high pollinator and wildlife value. 
Garden for Wildlife Program offers tools and a strategy that reduces reliance on insecticides and herbicides across the nation. 

Accept the Million Pollinator Garden Challenge!

Create pollinator gardens and manage existing gardens for pollinators; follow the Pollinator Partnership’s lead and learn from them!

June 28, 2017 - Houston, TX

Wednesday, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.

Houston Chapter of NPAT

Texas Prairie Restoration: One Goal, Multiple Approaches.

How past land use dictates restoration efforts.

Andy Newman, Mitigation Banking Program Manager from Harris County Flood Control District will be speaking about the challenges of restoring our Texas rice fields to viable prairie ecosystems.
HNPAT’s June Meeting will be at: Cherie Flores Garden Pavilion at Hermann Park Directions and Parking.

The primary mission of restoration projects is the reestablishment of native plant communities utilizing historic literature and existing undisturbed habitats as species composition guidelines.  Harris County Flood Control District is currently restoring two different coastal prairies.  While the objective on both properties is the same, restoration of wet prairies, the methods vary.  This talk will detail the differences and similarities of converting a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) plantation and old rice/cattle allotment into functional coastal prairie.

Andy Newman’s primary responsibility is the restoration of wetlands and streams to provide no-net loss of waters and wetlands in accordance with Section 404 of the Clean Water Act for all HCFCD projects.  Properties managed include a variety of habitats including bottomland hardwood forests, prairies, emergent marshes, and pine savannahs.  In addition to restoration, Mr. Newman has experience with wetland ecology, bird biology, identification of sedges and grasses, aquatic insects, and vegetation community classification.

June 28, 2017 - Fort Worth, TX

Pedaling the Prairie - Chisholm Trail Park

Wednesday, from 6 – 7pm

Chisholm Trail Community Center, 4936 McPherson Blvd, Fort Worth, TX 76123
•  Participants may bring their own bike or rent one of ours.
Take advantage of our brand new trail, get fresh air, exercise and social opportunities with family, friends and neighbors!

For more info: Call 817/392-8070 or go to http://fortworthtexas.gov/chisholmtrailcc/

July 11, 2017 (due to July 4th Holiday) -  San Antonio, TX

Tuesday, from 7pm-8:30pm

San Antonio Chapter of NPAT

“9-Natives Landscape Plans”, Lan Shen

Meet us at the City of San Antonio’s Lions Field Adult and Senior Center,

Lan Shen will be presenting on the concept of “9 Natives” developed by Jaime Gonzales of the Katy Prairie Conservancy & Coastal Prairie Partnership (CPP), to encourage the use of local native plants.

She will be talking about all phases of promoting the 9-Natives concept in the Greater Houston area:
from the initial 9-Natives design contest
to developing practical 9-Natives landscape plans by Clark Condon Associates, a Houston architecture firm. 

This project began as a contest, sponsored by CPP & Houston-NPAT, to design a garden landscape for homeowners using 9 native plants that (as either plants or seeds) could be purchased.
The hope was this project would also be a means to encourage local nurseries to carry these native plants for sale.
Lan was one of the two winners of the FIRST “9-Natives Contest” in Houston; she will discuss her award winning design and how this concept of using 9 natives can be applied to other cities to encourage the use of native plants in home and public gardens.
Lan will provide information on the 9 native plants proposed for the greater Houston area and talk about growth requirements for some Central Texas native species currently available at local nurseries.
It is hoped that this example of citizen participation in furthering the use of natives in urban gardens will inspire those in the Central Texas area to develop plans of their own design using the same guidelines developed in Houston and perhaps offer a similar contest to encourage native landscape designs for the Central Texas area.

Our Presenter, Lan Shen
is the past 3-year President of the Houston NPAT Chapter; 
the Activity Coordinator for Lawther-Deer Park Prairie, Deer Park, TX; and
a Master Naturalist in the Gulf Coast region of Texas.

SA NPAT chapter meetings will RESUME the 1st TUESDAY, August 1, 2017,  at 7 p.m. at this location.

Report on June 3, 2017, 2nd Annual Texas Prairies Tour!

Report from Executive Director, Pat Merkord, on the June 3, 2017

Second Annual Prairie Tour Sponsored by the Dallas Blackland Chapter

This was the Second Annual Prairie Tour sponsored and planned by the Blackland Chapter led by their President, Leigh Ann Ellis.  There were about 50 attendees, about 35 rode on the bus, and the rest, who followed in vehicles, came from Central and South Texas.

The bus departed from Dallas in pouring down rain!
But - it cleared for a beautiful day’s visit to Burleson Prairie. The owner of Burleson led the tour with information gained over many years of restoration efforts by Mickey and Bob Burleson. The prairie was beautiful with many species blooming and grasses waving in the morning breeze. It was a memorable visit.
We next headed to Salado for a fabulous lunch.
Then headed to Granger Lake to look at restoration efforts there and a discussion of the difficulty of maintaining restoration efforts. Visitors got to see large growths of Eastern Gama Grass and aggressive growth of Alamo Switchgrass.

After leaving Granger, the rain fell in torrents, and for a while we wondered if we would have to end the tour. We stopped for a rest at a gas station, discussed the situation; since it appeared that the weather might give us a break—

We decided to head on to the Riesel Prairie to view this prairie owned by Texas Agri-life A&M University and called the Riesel Watershed Project. The prairie had been beat down by the rain but the basket flowers and other bloomers were still holding up in colorful profusion. We described the ongoing research efforts in the use of native prairie plants in the control of erosion within watersheds and the value of these buffers to the quality and quantity of water within the watershed. It was agreed we should hold another field trip for a more in depth look at this valuable prairie and research site.
The tour ended with a visit to Simpson Prairie which is one of our easements near Crawford, Texas.
The storm clouds on the horizon with rays of sunshine coming out after an afternoon of rain lit up the colors of the prairie and we all took our fill of prairie pictures. It was a great end to a delightful day. 

Congratulations, Blackland NPAT Chapter!

This chapter, under the direction Leigh Ann Ellis, provided a delightful and very well attended Prairie Tour to Central Texas Prairies.
We all got to meet many new people to the prairie community and were inspired by comments from all on their enthusiasm and support for our Texas Prairies.

PHOTOS are on our Home page!
Our Blog is the site where we are creating our entire collection and hope to have all photos there SOON for everyone’s enjoyment !!  (We have been promised even more photographs!) 
THANKS to all our PHOTOGRAPHERS! 

July 19, 2017 - Victoria, TX

Wednesday, beginning at 6 p.m.

Organizational Meeting to Discuss Formation of

NPAT’s “Victoria Area Chapter”

Led by NPAT’s Board President, Barbara Keller-Willy

Meet us at the Bayside Seafood Restaurant.
Their “Event Room” has been reserved for “NPAT”.

Take a look at the Bayside Seafood Menu! 

Location: 4202 N Navarro St, Victoria, TX 77901, at the corner of Fillmore Avenue and Navarro Street (Hwy 77).

We invite you to join friends and neighbors, meet new ones, and enjoy a seafood dinner! 
Meet Barbara and learn the process of formally becoming an NPAT chapter!
We also will discuss conservation efforts and opportunities for restoring and sustaining our valuable Texas Prairie lands! 
Everyone is welcome, landowner or not!

 

Have You Watched Pollinators? Barbara Keller-Willy

Have you stopped not only to smell a flower but to watch a pollinator extracting nectar from a flower?
Thanks “Strands Prairie - Follet Island,”
for allowing us to refresh our minds in your beauty and wonder!

Gratitude and photos contributed by NPAT’s Board President, Barbara Keller-Willy

June 19 - 25, 2017

National Pollinator Week


Native pollinators can be two to three times as effective at pollinating agricultural crops as non-native honeybees.  They need native plants and natural landscapes to survive!

National Pollinator Week:
was founded and is led by the Pollinator Partnership dedicated exclusively to the protection and promotion of pollinators and their ecosystems.
is a time to celebrate pollinators and spread the word about what you can do to protect them! 
is a critical event to draw major attention to the importance Native Pollinators—bees, butterflies, moths, bats and birds—play to the world, their status, and how essential they are to people, food, the economy and ecosystems!

Dozens of conservation organizations across the U.S. formed the National Pollinator Garden Network “NPGN” in 2014 and launched the Million Pollinator Garden Challenge, a call to action to preserve and create gardens and landscapes that help revive the health of bees, butterflies, birds, bats and other pollinators across America. It is a response to President Barack Obama’s federal strategy to promote the health of pollinators by restoring or enhancing millions of acres of land for pollinators. 

We’ve highlighted two NPGN participants to illustrate nationwide responses to the ‘call to action’The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center  and the National Wildlife Federation.

Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center created:
Support Monarchs Through Project Milkweed to increase abundance of native milkweeds, by collecting & distributing seeds of NATIVE TEXAS MILKWEEDS to local growers so they can grow and promote local milkweed availability.
Become a Milkweed Grower - Growers participating in Project Milkweed are expected to grow a new generation of milkweeds from the seeds they receive from the Wildflower Center and then use these plants as a starter population to increase seed production.
How Pollinators Help Cotton Farmers - According to a study of South Texas by The University of Texas at Austin: increasing the diversity of pollinator species, including bees, flies and butterflies, can dramatically increase cotton production.  Increasing the diversity of pollinators could boost cotton production by up to 18 percent, yielding an increase in annual revenue of more than $1.1 million.
Browse Pollinator-Friendly Plants by Region or Insect Special Collections section of the Native Plant Information Network. They post lists of native plants recommended for various purposes; researchers can browse the collection or search within it using the combination search.

NWF created:
Mayors Monarch Pledge –This map shows participating cities (Check out Texas!) and their commitments across the U.S. and a tri-national agreement with Canada and Mexico, to increase habitat for the monarch butterfly and other native pollinators. 
Certified Habitat Program -owners/managers provide native plant habitat, food water, shelter and places to rear young for all types of wild creatures including pollinators. 
Butterfly Heroes Program provides seed packets and garden starter kits to youth groups, families and children to create monarch and pollinator gardens in communities across the U.S. 
Native Plant Finder helps gardeners and habitat managers identify plants and trees for their locale that have high pollinator and wildlife value. 
Garden for Wildlife Program offers tools and a strategy that reduces reliance on insecticides and herbicides across the nation. 

Accept the Million Pollinator Garden Challenge!

Create pollinator gardens and manage existing gardens for pollinators; follow the Pollinator Partnership’s lead and learn from them!

Press Release - June 2, 2017 - City of Meadows Place, TX

NPAT Offers Prairie Advice to Meadows Place

CenterPoint Powerline ROW - Pollinator Prairie Restoration

Imagine you are a child visiting a prairie for the first time, and you are able to climb up onto a saddle beside a stand of big blue stem and other prairie grasses to experience how historic prairies grew as high as the horse’s belly and went as far as the eye could see …with the help of virtual reality.

Students & visitors to the City of Meadows Place Prairie Pollinator Project will be able to do this & more!
Photo by: Colene Cabezas, Parks Director, City of Meadows Place   

As a Monarch Host City, the City of Meadows Place’s leadership selected approximately 13 acres of CenterPoint powerline ROW to restore to coastal prairie for their large acreage pollinator plot

16 miles SW of Houston, the total area of Meadows Place is 0.9 square miles, and of that area they will create .02 square miles of pollinator habitat or 2.22% of their total city area. 
This project has significance to the entire Houston area as it is one of the first powerline (PL) right-of-ways (ROWs) in the area to be approved for pollinator habitat.
This is one section of 7 contiguous miles of PL ROW which could be restored
This site will include significant PL ROW education as part of the project, which sets the tone for secondary use as pollinator habitat without compromising or forgetting the main purpose of PL ROWS.

The site runs through a city park, which will include an identification garden where residents can identify plants and insects without entering the ROW, as well as a wetland pollinator habitat.
It is next door to a city nature center which will include quail and pollinator education as part of their curriculum. 
Bob White Brigades will deliver quail education on-site.
Students from nearby Meadows Elementary School will use the combination park, restored prairie and nature center to contribute to their science curriculum.

Partners donating time, money, grants, expertise, plants, seeds and supplies include:
Monarch Gateway, Native Prairies Association of Texas,  Brazos River Prairie Chapter of Quail ForeverU.S. Fish and Wildlife Service,  Houston WildernessWildlife Habitat Federation, Coastal Prairie PartnershipMeadows Home & Garden ClubCoastal Prairie Texas Master Naturalists; scouts, students and individuals. 

We invite the continued participation of current and future partners.

Report on May 20-22, 2017 Maddin Breeding Bird Survey

Submitted by Kirsti Harms


Pat Merkord and I were joined by Tom Willard (Blackland Chapter) and Kelly Walker (Houston Chapter for our annual breeding bird survey on the weekend of May 20, 2017.

The area had just received about 8 inches of rain and there was water and mud everywhere! The creek was flowing and showed signs of having been up at least 15 feet.  Because of the storm fronts and rain-cooled air, it turned out to be a much cooler weekend than I had expected.

Because of the cool temperatures, we didn’t see any horned lizards or any other lizards (photo by Pat Merkord, Maddin Prairie, 2016). 

However! the Couch’s Spadefoot toad Scaphiopus couchii (left: photo Google.com)
 
and Great Plains Narrowmouth toads Gastrophryne olivacea (right: photo: Texas Parks and Wildlife) did put on quite a concert Friday and Saturday night in the ponds that were formed by all the rain. Amazing how fast they went into action!

This part of the state has been getting rain all spring, and it was apparent in the bird numbers.  We had our usual summer residents in good numbers as well as the not-as-usual breeding birds like Dickcissels Spiza americana
and LeConte’s Sparrows Ammodramus leconteii (photo: Cornell Labs).

Of course, Kelly was keeping track of our butterflies and other insects. 
We made a couple of trips to a blooming lotebush Ziziphus obtusifolia
that was covered in insects of all kinds.

(photo of lotebush blooms by Louis R. Nugent, Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center)

Kelly and Pat took lots of photos (to be posted soon).
Thanks to our great volunteers,
we’re getting a very nice collection.
Perhaps someday we can start a photo gallery for Maddin Prairie.

It is on my to-do list! -Kirsti Harms

Register by June 20 for June 21, Victoria, TX

Wednesday, 9 a.m.—3 p.m.

“Watershed Texas” The Texas Coastal Watershed Program

of Texas A&M University

Location: Victoria Educational Gardens Pavilion

FREE TO PUBLIC - MUST REGISTER BY June 20
Speakers and Topics:

Charriss York, Green Stormwater Infrastructure Program Specialist:
“Collecting and cleansing stormwater runoff at home, the neighborhood, and schools”
Mary Carol Edwards, Stormwater Wetland Program Specialist:
“Using wetlands in flood control basins for water quality and habitat”
Marissa Llosa, Wetland Restoration Program Specialist:
“How large-scale wetland restoration benefits us all”
Stephanie Hendrickson, WaterSmart Program Coordinator:
“Water-efficient landscapes to provide function and beauty”

August 4, 2017 - Houston, TX

Friday from 8:30 am to 3:00 pm

Greater Houston Environmental Summit & Environmental Education Expo

August 16 thru 18, Abilene, TX

Wednesday thru Friday

Early registration ends Mon., August 7!

Discounted rate of $50 (or $20 Student Rate)

Co-hosts are: Texas A&M AgriLife Extension, Texas Parks & Wildlife Department, & Texas Wildlife Association.

FULL AGENDA/ REGISTRATION for this Statewide Quail Symposium!

PRE-SYMPOSIUM FIELD DAY,
Wednesday, August 16, Hailey Ranch, Abilene, TX

Subject: “Habitat Management and Monitoring Techniques for Quail”
Our graduating QuailMasters* class of 2017 will also be available to answer questions and assist with plant identification.

SYMPOSIUM,
Thursday & Friday, August 17 & 18, MCM Elegante Hotel

Featuring a variety of speakers:
From agency personnel to land managers and researchers, answering frequently asked questions regarding quail management in Texas!
From quail research organizations!
From experts, who will debate controversial topics, such as the “role of introduced plants in quail habitat” and “the viability of translocation for restoring wild populations”.

*QuailMasters
is a series of intensive, hands-on training sessions about quail habitat and the science of quail management in Texas. Landowners, hunters, quail enthusiasts, wildlife biologists, and others are invited to participate. The program is provided by the Texas Wildlife Association and the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service.

June 7, Georgetown, TX

Cen-Tex NPAT Chapter Monthly Meeting


June 12, 2017 - Fort Worth, TX

Fort Worth NPAT Chapter’s Meet-Up

Monday, from 6:30pm - 8:00pm

Bring your friends and anyone interested in reviving Fort Worth’s landscape to Amon G. Carter, Jr. - Downtown YMCA , 512 Lamar Street, Fort Worth.

Welcome Zach Gomez!

Mr. Gomez is the Gardener at Fort Worth Botanic Garden’s Tinsley/Rock Springs Garden section,  located on one of the oldest city park lands and is designed as a North Central Texas Native Plant Garden using primarily plants native to the Western Cross Timbers.

Zach’s presentation Monday evening will include:
1. Brief History of Rock Springs Woods;
2. Transformation to the Tinsley Garden;
3. The Garden Design, Renovation v. Restoration, Use of Native Plants;
4. The Future of the Tinsley Garden; and
5. The current Native Forest Ecological Restoration of South Woods and Lagoons.

Our presenter, Zach Gomez:
has 20 years of experience working in virtually all aspects of landscape horticulture, from retail nursery, golf course operations, organic vegetable production, and landscape design and installation; 
has been instrumental in the final design, installation, and maintenance of Rock Springs since June 2015;
his favorite hobby is to spend time with his two daughters hiking and hunting for plants around the area to propagate and introduce to the Garden.

June 13, 2017 - San Antonio, TX

San Antonio NPAT Chapter Monthly Meetup

7pm - the 2nd Tuesday of each month

The City of San Antonio Park & Recreation Department’s Lion’s Field Adult Center

This meeting will be held in the ART STUDIO

Join us as we welcome Barbara Keller-Willy!
She continues to devote her time and share her knowledge of all things pollinator!

June 3, 2017 -  Dallas to Central TX and back to Dallas!

Blackland NPAT Chapter’s 2nd Annual Texas Prairies Tour!

RISE & SHINE!  The bus leaves Dallas Saturday at ‘O-700’ - that’s 7:00 a.m.!!

Our Northeast Texas Prairies Tour was so much fun last year, we’re doing it again,
but this time we’re taking a tour bus from Dallas south to Central Texas!

ENJOY short excursions in beautiful grasslands; most of which are not generally open to the public!
A chance to STAND IN AWE in a native prairie as it was before westward expansion.
We’ll also LEARN about native prairie restorations and management.
BECOME INSPIRED on how to keep native prairies thriving for generations to come! 

We’ll zip southward to near Temple (between Waco and Austin);
Enjoy lunch in Salado (included in tour fee)
We’ll drive south to near Taylor (east of Round Rock).
We’ll then head north to Marlin (SE of Waco), where we’ll visit a series of small Blackland Prairies.
We’ll travel west of Waco to tour an example of a Grand prairie.
Heading toward home we’ll enjoy dinner in West, TX (on your own dime).

REGISTER ONLINE TODAY LIMITED AVAILABILITY

Many NPAT members living in Central Texas (closer to these prairies than the Dallas departure site) have expressed great interest in this opportunity to visit prairies! 
We’ve created a 3rd registration option enabling you to do just that! Please open the link above and register online by selecting the option to follow the tour bus in your private vehicle. 
Later in the month of May, we will send you information so you can make your plans, notify us where you’ll join us, and we can define ‘meet up’ places & times!

COME PREPARED:
Wear loose hiking clothes and sturdy shoes for prairie walking.
Bring a hat, bug repellant, and sunscreen.
Binoculars might be a good idea and a ‘back-up power’ for your phone (a good idea for such a long day).
Your favorite ‘road snacks/beverages’ and books/etc., will help pass the time while traveling;

ITINERARY & GUIDES

DEPARTURE TIME: 7:00am our BUS LEAVES parking lot of Bath House Cultural Center, Dallas.
NPAT will provide maps and notes on each prairie.
Prairie #1: Burleson Prairie (pictured in photo above), Oenaville (east of Temple).  Prairie Guide: Mickey Burleson, Owner of Burleson Prairie.  This native prairie was restored by Mickey and her late husband, Bob Burleson. They spent decades recording prairie data, restoring hundreds of acres of native prairie, and focusing on state wide conservation efforts.

Lunch in Salado with Dolly Kunz Wilson. (Included in tour fee.)

Prairie #2: Granger Lake Prairie, Granger Lake Park, Taylor. Prairie Guide: Pat Merkord, Executive Director, NPAT.  Pat will explain restoration procedures taken on this native tall grass prairie site, planted in 1994 in a cooperative effort between NPAT, Texas Parks and Wildlife, and the Army Corps of Engineers.

Prairie #3: Lehmann Prairie and Prairie #4: Riesel Prairie (Both prairies are near each other in the Marlin area.) Prairie Guide: Pat Merkord, Executive Director, NPAT.
The Lehmann Prairie and the Riesel Prairie are about 10 miles apart.
The Lehmann Prairie is an 11-acre remnant prairie protected by a conservation easement. 
The Riesel Prairie is a 5-acre remnant prairie owned by NPAT. 
Both are excellent examples of the native tall grass lands that were extremely prevalent in Central Texas area prior to European settlement.

Prairie #5: Simpson Prairie, near Crawford Prairie Guides: Marliss and Mike Williams.
Mike was instrumental with the prairie restoration work with President George W. and First Lady Laura Bush’s Crawford ranch. 
The Simpson Prairie is a remnant of the Grand Prairie (Lampasas Cut Plains of the Cross Timbers and Prairies) on a gently sloping hillside. 
The Williams have allowed the prairie to return to what it was like prior to overgrazing.
This prairie is a 100 acre tract with 75 acres protected by a conservation easement with NPAT.

Dinner in downtown West - (on your own dime).  Each of these restaurants is within a block of other two on North Main Street, West, TX:
1. Pichas Czech-American Restaurant
2. Two Amigos Mexican Restaurant
3. West Station Roadhouse Restaurant

RETURN: 10:30 to 11pm: to the parking lot of Bath House Cultural Center, Dallas.
Questions or need more information?
Address your REGISTRATION questions to: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).
If you need additional TOUR INFORMATION plese call: Leigh Ann Ellis of the Blackland NPAT Chapter in Dallas: 214.321.7159.

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